[EBB Sightings] White-Winged Scoters continue in Alameda

[EBB Sightings] White-Winged Scoters continue in Alameda

Harv and Monica
Fri Nov 13 12:52:39 PST 2009
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    Found the male white-winged scoter at 10:30 yesterday morning at the same
    location on Ferry Point Road at the seaplane lagoon at Alameda Point in
    Alameda. In addition, we sighted a second male white-winged scoter further
    along the road in the NE corner of the lagoon. It was about 100 feet
    offshore. We did not see any females. Note: Alameda Point is the name of the
    former naval air station, not a geographic feature. 
    
    Here is a quick way to find the lagoon: Drive to Alameda and head to the
    west end of the island. You will find the defunct naval base (Alameda Point)
    there. Drive onto the base and look for large ships docked near the SE
    corner of the base. They are visible from most places on the base. Drive to
    the ships and you will see a large rectangular lagoon just to the north.
    Ferry Point road runs along the eastern side of the lagoon. Look for the
    scoters along this road. 
    
    Alice: As of last nite, Southshore beach and Crab Cove remain closed. Do not
    know when they will reopen. Call Crab Cove Visitor Center for status. To my
    amazement, we have been finding snowy plovers every day on Southshore beach
    near the intersection of Shoreline Drive and Sunset Road. The best birding
    we have found is at a moderate low tide at Crab Cove and at the viewing
    platforms off of Bayview Drive on the SE side of the island about 1/4 mile
    NW of the Bay Farm Bridge. Look for the public access shoreline signs on the
    right side of Bayview as you head toward the bridge. Besides the usual
    shorebirds we saw 59 red knots there day before yesterday. Unfortunately, we
    also found 65 lightly oiled black bellied plovers.  Best time to go is a
    moderate low tide before noon; after that the birds are up-sun. I don't have
    anything planned for Tues. Give me a call or email time and place, would
    enjoy tagging along. 510-769-0918.
    
    Lisa: Yes that was me. After that, I signed up to be on the Oiled Wildlife
    Care Network/International Bird Research and Rescue (OWCN/IBRRC) field team
    for wildlife recovery during oil spills. It is a year-long training program.
    Luckily the team had gotten HAZWOPR certifications this summer, so we were
    able to participate in this oil spill. I was activated about 10 days ago and
    have been doing day-long surveys since then. The low point was spending two
    days in a kayak chasing oiled coots on Bay Farm Island. I have a newfound
    respect for coots. The high point was working with a USGS biologist and a
    USFWS biologist catching clapper rails in Elsie Roemer refuge. We caught 3
    and found 1 oiled. The last recovery team (myself and a field biologist from
    PRBO) was deactivated last nite. All total, the recovery teams collected
    around 50 birds, most of them alive. I don't know the status of the live
    birds that went to IBRRC for rehab. 
    
    To learn more about OWCN and IBRRC, here are their web sites:
    
    http://www.owcn.org/
    
    http://www.ibrrc.org/
    
    Here is the OWCN blog on the spill. It provides daily reports and pix on how
    the wildlife recovery went:
    
    http://owcnblog.wordpress.com/
    
    
    Good Birding
    
    Harv Wilson
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    


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