[EBB Sightings] short-eared owls on Nimitz Way

[EBB Sightings] short-eared owls on Nimitz Way

Kay Loughman
Fri Aug 29 23:12:26 PDT 2008
  • Previous Message: [EBB Sightings] short-eared owls on Nimitz Way
  • Next Message: [EBB Sightings] Red-necked Phalaropes @ Dumbarton Bridge
  • << back to index

    
    I've never heard Short-eared Owls vocalize, and didn't know there were 
    any in our east bay hills, so I had to double check the sound when I 
    read esimms message.  False alarm for me, but . . .
    
    Tonight from about 9pm and continuing as I write, we've had two owls in 
    my neighborhood on the side of Claremont Canyon on the Oakland/Berkeley 
    border.  One has been vocalizing with a slightly nasal scream, so 
    frequently and regularly, at first I thought it was some unknown 
    mechanical object.  But actually, the sound was coming from what was 
    more likely an immature Great Horned Owl communicating its position or 
    begging for food from an adult - which may have been the other bird.  I 
    could not see horns on either one.  I've been able to see both birds - 
    poorly - on the roof of a neighbor's house; regrettably my photo 
    equipment and skill is not up to the task of collecting an image.  We've 
    heard the more familiar GHOW hoots over this week; but are not getting 
    any of that tonight.
    
    Kay Loughman
    Berkeley
    
    
    
    
    esimms at berkeley.edu wrote:
    > This evening along Nimitz Way, in the first clump of pines up the hill
    > from the Inspiration Point parking lot, and shortly after sundown as the
    > western rim of the sky glowed tangerine orange over Mt. Tam through the
    > bishop pines and Jupiter shone to the south, we were startled by
    > insistent, loud, scratchy, nasal cries emanating  from multiple locations
    > among the pines.  By chance, we got an excellent view of a moderately
    > large owl on a limb about 20 feet overhead.  It had a well-rounded head,
    > lacking any of the "ears" of a great-horned owl, and the face was clearly
    > not that funny heart shape of a barn owl.  After perusing the bird book
    > tonight and listening to various calls available on the internet, we've
    > concluded that it was most likely a group of two to several short-eared
    > owls, roosting in the pines.
    > 
    > There were also several bats of at least two sizes and a hearty chorus of
    > cicadas and crickets.
    > 
    > A very special evening treat.
    


    << back to index